Similarities and differences between picasso matisse relationship

Matisse and Picasso's gentle rivalry - express-leader.info

The relationship between the artists Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso is Side by side, a Matisse and a Picasso can look amazingly similar. No artist is an island. Even polar opposites have things in common. Take those two giant figures of 20th-century art, Henri Matisse (). Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, one of the twentieth century's of this rivalry and its many points of contrast can be found in the archives of.

Matisse wasted little time in painting an unflinching response—his Bathers with a Turtle. Picasso is understanding it as decomposition, and Matisse is understanding it as composition. Both Picasso and Matisse had viewed a collection of Gauguin woodcuts inand his South Seas primitivism showed up in woodcuts they both made soon after.

As French curator Baldassari comments, both Matisse and Picasso were looking at anything that would help them break with the past. They used images from erotic cinema meant for voyeurs, not painters.

The question of line, of composition, was secondary, although the distortion, the perversion of line, was very important to them. It was a game with form, with figuration. The question at the moment was how to leave the past. It was the question of ugliness. It was said that Picasso hung the Matisse in a room where his friends threw fake darts at it.

Matisse was shocked by it then, but his portrait of Marguerite was an exact mirror of it. The painting was a sort of joke, a tribute to Picasso. A short time before the exchange, Baldassari explains, Matisse had been attacked in the press for a still life of his own.

Picasso and Henri Matisse

Picasso plunged into Cubism with both feet, collaborating in the beginning with Braque. Baldassari says that Picasso was sick that summer and Matisse visited him often. And right after this, he became involved in exploring Cubism in his own painting. But even in opposition, as in these two portraits, the dialogue between the two artists was clear. Sometimes, however, it was more subtle.

Matisse had done the sets and costumes for a Diaghilev ballet a few years before, which irked Picasso when he heard about it. A balcony with a big red flowerpot falling all over it! The visual analogies are obvious: The Three Dancers, like the Demoiselles, was a kind of exorcism. By the s, the two painters had drifted apart.

Picasso, Chagall, Matisse. Masters Artists and Friendships

Matisse was ensconced in a hotel in Nice painting luxurious odalisques and drawing portraits of women in plumed hats. But even then they kept an eye on each other. In the late s Picasso fell in love with Marie-Therese Walter, a young woman almost Grecian in her grace.

During his early years in Nice, Matisse often used the traditional motif of the odalisque, or harem-girl. In Decorative Figure on an Ornamental Background —26which caused a critical uproar when it was first exhibited in Paris inMatisse positions an illogically sculpted, three-dimensional nude figure against a flamboyantly colored and patterned flat background.

During World War II, while Matisse was isolated in Nice and Picasso remained in difficult circumstances in occupied Paris, they managed to exchange works and drew support from one another. After the war ended, Picasso joined Matisse in the south of France, and the now famous and wealthy artists saw each other regularly as their relationship entered its final and closest phase.

In one version, Women of Algiers, after Delacroix Canvas NPicasso keeps both Delacroix and Matisse alive but contorts the figures in harsh, aggressive ways that are strictly his own. The haunting final juxtaposition in the exhibition consists of two self-portrayals made at a time of personal crisis for each artist: In viewing them together, one can see echoes of motif, emotion, and form.

In Violinist at the Window, Matisse fuses three themes that recurred throughout his career: It's like the first key to understanding them. When Picasso's friend Braque sent a group of his own new paintings to the Salon d'Automne inMatisse was one of the jurors.

  • Matisse and Picasso's gentle rivalry
  • Two masters, one friendship: the story of Matisse and Picasso

A critic heard this and baptized "Cubism" in the press. At the same time, though, Matisse took his most important collector,a Russian textile czar named Shchukin, to see the Demoiselles in Picasso's studio. It was an act of great generosity on Matisse's part. Picasso plunged into Cubism with both feet, collaborating in the beginning with Braque.

Matisse's response can best be seen in one of his most beautiful paintings, Portrait of Madame Matisse made inin which her face appears masklike. Picasso was sick that summer and Matisse visited him often. In Picasso's studio, he saw a white African mask hanging near the portrait of Marguerite he had given Picasso.

Of Madame Matisse's portrait, the poet Guillaume Apollinaire said Matisse had reinvented voluptuousness in painting.

Matisse & Picasso

Abstract as it is, with its masklike face and flattened sense of space, the serene portrait contrasts strikingly, despite certain similarities in format and subject, with Picasso's Portrait of a Young Girl, done the following year. In this painting, Picasso's Cubist approach undermines the serenity of the pose. But even in opposition, as in these two portraits, the dialogue between the two artists was clear.

Sometimes, however, it was more subtle. One painter might look far into the other's past, taking up where he had long ago left off. There are many examples of such cross-pollination, but one of the most striking is Picasso's monumental The Three Dancers.

It was done in when he was working on the sets for the great Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Matisse had done the sets and costumes for a Diaghilev ballet a few years before, which irked Picasso when he heard about it. A balcony with a big red flowerpot falling all over it! The visual analogies are obvious: Picasso's painting, however, was utterly savage, while Matisse's retained some sense of grace.

At the time, Picasso's marriage to Olga, an ex-ballerina, was failing, and he'd just gotten news of an old friend's death. The Three Dancers, like the Demoiselles, was a kind of exorcism. By the s, the two painters had drifted apart. Matisse was ensconced in a hotel in Nice painting luxurious odalisques and drawing portraits of women in plumed hats. But even then they kept an eye on each other. In the late s Picasso fell in love with Marie-Therese Walter, a young woman almost Grecian in her grace.

To paint her, Picasso found himself borrowing the more flowing lines, rounded figures and vivid colors of Matisse. For his part, Matisse continued to distill the luminosity of Nice in his paintings.

Art History News: Matisse & Picasso: The lifelong relationship

It's like a paradise you have no right to analyze, but you are a painter, for God's sake! Nice is so beautiful! Alight so soft and tender, despite its brilliance. There were moments when Picasso's portraits and Matisse's seemed painted with the same brush, if not the same hand.

Picasso looked after Matisse's paintings, stored in a bank vault. Matisse, in ill health, defended Picasso against his critics. He is living in Paris quietly, has no wish to sell, asks for nothing.

At the war's end ina major show of their work was held at the Victoria and AlbertMuseum in London. As he prepared for this exhibition, Matisse wrote in a notebook: As I'm expecting to see him tomorrow, my mind is at work. I'm doing this propaganda show in London with him. I can imagine the room with my pictures on one side, and his on the other.

It's as if I were going to cohabit with an epileptic. His long struggle to purify form, to make figures beautiful by making them simpler, to show essence and erase detail, led him back to the child's art of paper cutouts. Some of these were huge, others small enough for him to manage from bed.

When a Dominican priest invited him in to design a chapel in the town of Vence, he prepared some of the images for the stained-glass windows and wall decorations by cutting out paper. Picasso, too, took up a pair of shears. He made a series of sculptures that look like paper cutouts, though they are of sheet metal. And his paintings seemed to take on a Matissean simplicity of form, even a decorative exuberance.